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20091101
20091130
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
investigative correspondent lisa myers. >> reporter: ann mckie had been on shutterfly buying photos and later found some unwanted charges on her credit card, monthly fees for a membership club called reservation rewards. >> this was going for a service which i did not want, did not need, and had no knowledge of getting. >> reporter: today a senate committee said millions of consumers have unwittingly signed up for these clubs. and investigators accuse the companies involved of aggressive sales tactics intentionally designed to mislead online shoppers. >> tricking customers into buying goods and services that they do not want is not okay. >> reporter: an expert shows us how it works. after you buy something on popular websites, another offer pops up. it looks like a coupon from the retailer, but it's actually from a third party company. click on, and you will be billed every month for a discount membership club, a fact often disclosed only in the small print. >> what's most deceptive is that your credit card is charged without you ever typing in your credit card number. >> reporter: that's rig
investigative correspondent lisa myers. >> reporter: sharon terrace, who has advocated for people with credit card problems, didn't think it would happen to her. but in the last year citibank hiked her credit card interest rate three times. from 7% to 15%, then to 26%, and now to 30%. >> they want my business because they want to rip me off. and there isn't much that i can do about it. >> reporter: she admits she had a late payment but says the increase hurts a lot because she owes $10,000 on her card. when she called citi to protest, she was told the rate hike was a business decision. the bank needs to make money. >> i wanted to scream at the woman and say, well, you didn't make good business decisions before. we had to bail you out, and now you're making us pay you again. >> reporter: credit card reforms approved in may would outlaw this kind of retroactive rate increase on money consumers have already spent. but congress gave banks until next february to comply with the new rules, and banks have used that time to significantly raise rates. >> the bill is passed. >> reporter: today the hous
to customer service. lisa robinson the planes -- explains. >> hopefully you will have good luck, but that was not always the case. >> we sent her to a dozen stores in the baltimore area to make purchases and give us for overall opinion of the experience, including the help she received and the cleanliness of the waiting rooms. some got it right. >> service was excellent. she gave me a little bag and a gift receipt. >> other places, well, she thought some of them were not so good. >> i would have walked up the door. such a shambles. >> we went to see which secret shoppers want the best, and which did not cut it. >> thank you. a new mutation in the h1n1 flu virus, and health officials are concerned. how a changing swine flu could change the way doctors treat the out by -- outbreaks. plus, why some students received out by -- outbreaks. plus, why some students received a tool of ..when your nose is raw and sore. plain tissue can make it burn even more. but mom knows there's puffs plus... ...with the magic of three. soothing lotion with a touch of shea butter, aloe and e. plain tiss
are designed to protect people like private jordan sid, who nbc lisa myers profiled in september. after joining the army, sid opened his first checking account with his parents signed up as monitors, who soon saw each time jordan overdrew his account, even by just a few dollars, he was charged a $35 overdraft fee. in one day with purchases of just $33, he was charged $175 in fees. >> i'm not saying that my son shouldn't pay a penalty, but i think that they're just hanging him with all of these fees and it's ridiculous. >> reporter: today the fed put an end to that. starting july 1st, banks will no longer be allowed to automatically sign customers up for overdraft protection on atm and debit cards. instead, they must choose it. consumer vadvocates say it's a big first step. >> bad economy. the banks got us there. we need a way to get out. and one of the things that will level that playing field is for consumers to finally have a fair shake in these products. >> reporter: but the banks, expected to earn some $38 billion in overdraft fees this year, today said the new rules could lead some custome
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)